Posts filed under Design Thinking

Can Customer Experience Become Your Brand?

It is apparent to big brands that Customer Experience is what keeps customers coming back time and time again. Steve Olenski, a top Content Marketing Influencer and Forbes & HuffPost contributor, describes CX as a journey that never ends.

"Brands need to continually work harder to get closer to the destination without ever reaching it so customers keep coming back for more.”

The experience starts to become the brand - banks are creating delightful online experiences, hotels are delivering more memorable moments for their visitors, museums are focusing on creating emotional connections with their visitors.

How will your brand become the experience that your customers keep coming back for?

To read the article click here

9 CUSTOMER JOURNEY COMPONENTS

Why focus on the customer journey? Because the customer journey itself can create value for the customer. It is a key source of differentiation between competing products and services. A third of customers leave brands after one negative experience, thats why it is ever so important that we optimise EVERY interaction customers have with your company across their journey. This article breaks down the nine journey mapping components to help you take the first step towards customer centricity.

To read more click here

Being a Meaningful Brand

“Make consumers’ lives better.” This is what businesses and brands must do. Makes sense, doesn’t it? More often than not, brands fail to meet this need. A Co.Exist article discusses the need for brands today to create meaningful lives. Umair Haque, blogger from Harvard Business Review claims, "The next global economy isn’t just about stuff, it’s about human lives." Over time, what consumers look for in a brand has drastically changed over time from what the product does to how it makes you feel to who you are. Today it is about making a better you.

The marketplace is cluttered with businesses that sell “throwaway” products in the name of consumerism and brands that are stained with negative experiences, making it difficult for anyone with a conscience to associate with. There are however, amidst it all, brands that do it right. These are the customer centric businesses that genuinely want to improve the livelihood of its customers.

“Your customers, are beginning to take a quantum leap into an era where a life meaningfully well lived is what really counts."

In order to keep up in this era, some brands may have to undergo internal rebuilding so that fulfilling the customer’s desire for a more meaningful life is achievable. This might mean realigning your core values with your customers and creating a cultural change within your work place that focuses on your customers' ultimate need. Keep up with the new era of change and be the brand that is far more meaningful than ever before, be the brand that makes your customers’ lives better. At Proto Partners we can help you to do this. Our goal is to “help organisations enrich the lives of customers, one customer experience at a time.” hence making a more meaningful brand.

"Showrooming" and Mobiles, Retail's Enemy or Friend?

“Showrooming” is when people come into store to look at products and go away from the retail store to view it online to find cheaper options. With “showrooming” on the rise, how can retail stores keep customers in stores? A realbusiness article suggests says it’s as simple as using mobile in store.

Research shows that most people who showroom actually use their mobiles during their shopping experience. Mobile is a threat to the retail environment, however there is also an opportunity to make friends with the enemy. Companies can now interact with their customers while they shop through their mobiles, perhaps there could be a mobile retail assistant? Or perhaps specials made available through mobiles or even product suggestions as you browse the store. “It’s the perfect tool for businesses to find new ways to make buying in-store the convenient option.” By truly understanding how mobile are used by customers and their retail journey experience with you, opportunities for a successful new form of interaction with your brand is made possible.

Read the full article here.

Customers = Brand Experience

In an article from MediaPost, Ingrid Froelich emphasizes that “brand experience is defined by your customers' perceptions of their interaction with you.” The way that your customers experience your brand across channels whether they are active or passive in this, all affect the way they see your brand. This can make your break your brand experience. “To stand out, organisations now need to meet and exceed customer expectations.”

So how is this done? First, you need to know your customers and what exactly are their expectations.

  1. Know your customers. The easiest way of doing this is not by assuming what they know but by simply listening to your customers. Take an ‘Outside In’ perspective to help you to understand and emphasize with your customers because the customer voice can strongly affect the way your brand is perceived. “By hearing the customer voice, the organisation can prioritize change and support the most valuable touchpoints.” Every channel has value, however, by placing your focus on the areas your customers most value, it will become a win-win situation.
  2. Don’t be a stalker. It’s great knowing your customers but not in the same way a stalker knows their victim. To create a genuine brand experience, it is important to give your customers privacy. Combine your real-time data with information your customers have volunteered to give to you. “Responsible use of customer data enhances loyalty by responding to preferences.”
  3. Weave customer-centricity throughout your organisation. Customers do not necessarily think about the operations and different departments behind their experience with your brand, whether they are good or bad. “All of the good intentions in the world and all of the speeches from CEOs and customer advocates in your organization cannot replace the need for a fundamental customer-centric culture and process.” Therefore every aspect of your organisation must maintain customer-centric goals so that the customer experience is seamless and consistent.

Read more of MediaPost’s points here. 

The Debate on how to be Customer Centric

A blog post by Wim Rampen discusses an article titled: “Customer Centricity, still in its infancy”. Wim Rampen believes that a CEM (Customer Experience Management)/CRM (Customer Relationship Management) strategies aren’t a necessity or a simple solution for companies to become customer centric. His argument claims that small businesses can be customer centric and therefore it can work on a large scale as well meaning that a CEM/CRM strategy does not need to be in place. Customer Centricity, we believe, is a result of a cultural change made in a business. This  change is one that has been mutually agreed upon and delivered through every aspect of the business. People are the heart of any organisation and when those people put people first (their customers), the organisation becomes truly customer centric. This is a result of clear, comphrehensive and sustainable customer orientated goals and training.

Businesses without a clear direction or understanding of their customers often have difficulty in becoming customer centric. Proto Partners help companies to uncover their customers’ wants and needs, areas where improvement is most needed (and will yield profits) and ways it can be implemented.

Read Wim's post here.